By Taran Adarsh, November 4, 2011 - 11:02 IST



Some films take a long time to hit the screens. Resultantly, the story appears obsolete, the gags fall flat and the outcome, therefore, lacks fizz. LOOT, directed by Rajnish Raj Thakur, is a been-there-seen-that kind of a ride that had everything going in its favor had it arrived a few years ago, but the time lapse seems to have played spoilsport here.

As the reels of LOOT unfold, you realize the film doesn't stand on its feet after you are introduced to the four protagonists. Reason: The perennial problem that ails most films -- slapdash screenplay. In reality, it's not merely a screenplay of convenience, but the writing is so disjointed at times that even the fine acting and some witty lines get overlooked in the route.

LOOT tells the story of Pandit [Govinda], Builder [Suniel Shetty], Akbar [Jaaved Jaaferi] and Wilson [Mahakshay Chakraborty], who are entrusted with the responsibility of carrying out a robbery in Pattaya, Thailand. But, as luck would have it, they rob a wrong address and find themselves in a mess, with a dreaded don [Mahesh Manjrekar] thirsting for their blood.



On paper, the concept of LOOT may have evoked super reactions by those reading it, but on celluloid, the film abounds in cinematic liberties, which gets hard to absorb after a point. Of course, LOOT is a hardcore masala film and one doesn't question the logic behind such plots. But the screenplay is so messy and with too many characters in the fray, the deficiencies loom large at every step.

The main culprit is the sloppy script and hence, there's not much director Rajnish Raj Thakur can do to salvage the show. There's no scope for songs in the movie, hence the track in the dance club in Pattaya and also towards the end credits [Rakhi Sawant number] doesn't add to the goings-on.

Govinda's comic timing is impeccable and he carries off some witty lines with amazing ease. Suniel Shetty is the best of the lot. He stays true to his character and handles his part like a pro. Like Govinda, Jaaved Jaaferi too has a flair for comic roles and he does a fine job. Mahakshay doesn't cut ice. Mika does well, given the fact that it's his debut film as an actor. Shweta Bhardwaj and Kim Sharma only add to the glam quotient.



Prem Chopra is passable. Mahesh Manjrekar doesn't evoke fear, though he's supposed to be a dreaded don. Ravi Kishen is getting typecast. Dalip Tahil and Deepraj Rana are just about okay. Shehzad Khan and Razzaq Khan are as usual.

On the whole, LOOT is an 80s style masala fare that lacks smart writing and slick direction. At best, it may find some patronage from spectators who relish typical masala fares.

Rating : 1.5 / 5 By India Fm