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Top 10 Most Expensive Projects in The World

These most expensive projects in the world belong to several projects in the world that cost a lot of money to make amazing results. Those projects become masterpiece of the human civilizations. Here’s 10 most expensive projects in the world. Those projects is like a parameter of how advanced human technology is. So here’s the list that maybe will make You inspired to make something more amazing

10. The Pearl Bridge : $ 5 Billions

This bridge has a longest center span from other suspension bridges, at 1991 meters (6532 feet). Located in Japan and completed in 1998. Connecting the mainland city of Kobe on Honshu to Iwaya on Awaji Island crossing a busy Akashi Strait.


The Pearl bridge

9. The Large Hadron Collider : $ 6 Billions

LHC is the world’s largest energy particle accelerator. LHC is located in a 27 kilometers (17 miles) tunnel and 175 meters (570 feet) below the French-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland.


The Large Hadron Collider

8. The James “Sunny Jim” Rolph Bridge : $ 6.3 Billions

A series of bridges in San Francisco Bay Area of California, in the United States. Establish a direct route between San Francisco and Oakland. Able to carry about 270,000 vehicles per day on two decks.


The James "Sunny Jim" Rolph Bridge

7. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER): $6,5 Billions

ITER is a research / engineering project that could help to make the transition of plasma physics to future electricity generation mix (fusion power plant).


International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

6. Trans-Alaska Pipeline System : $ 8 Billions

The Project consists of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, 11 gas stations, several hundred miles of feeder pipelines, and the Valdez Marine Terminal. Total length of 800.302 miles (1,287.961 km) and wide 48-inch (122 cm) pipeline delivering oil from Prudhoe Bay to Valdez, Alaska. Private property of the Alaska Pipeline Service Company.


Trans Alaska pipeline system


Trans Alaska Pipeline System in Snow

5. PCU Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78): $8.1 Billions

PCU Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) is to be the lead ship of her class of United States Navy supercarriers. As announced by the U.S. Navy on 16 January 2007, the ship will be named after the 38th President of the United States, the late Gerald R. Ford, whose World War II naval service included combat duty aboard the light aircraft carrier Monterey in the Pacific Theater.

Gerald R. Ford was laid down on 13 November 2009. Construction work began on 11 August 2005, when Northrop Grumman held a ceremonial steel cut for a 15-ton plate that will form part of a side shell unit of the carrier. The schedule calls for the ship to join the U.S. Navy’s fleet in 2015. Gerald R. Ford is slated to replace the current USS Enterprise, ending her then 50-plus years of service with the United States Navy.


PCU Gerald R Ford CVN 78

4. Le tunnel sous la Manche: $8.31 Billions

The Channel Tunnel (French: Le tunnel sous la Manche), known colloquially as the Chunnel, is a 50.5-kilometre (31.4 mi) undersea rail tunnel linking Folkestone, Kent near Dover in the United Kingdom with Coquelles, Pas-de-Calais near Calais in northern France beneath the English Channel at the Strait of Dover. At its lowest point it is 75 metres (250 ft) deep.At 37.9 kilometres (23.5 mi), the Channel Tunnel has the longest undersea portion of any tunnel in the world although the Seikan Tunnel in Japan is both longer overall, at 53.85 kilometres (33.46 mi) and deeper, at 240 metres (790 ft) below sea level.

The tunnel carries high-speed Eurostar passenger trains, Eurotunnel Shuttle roll-on/roll-off vehicle transport—the largest in the world—and international rail freight trains. The tunnel connects end-to-end with the LGV Nord and Channel Tunnel Rail Link high-speed railway lines. In 1996 the American Society of Civil Engineers identified the tunnel as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World.

Ideas for a cross-Channel fixed link appeared as early as 1802, but British political and press pressure over compromised national security stalled attempts to construct a tunnel. However, the eventual successful project, organised by Eurotunnel, began construction in 1988 and opened in 1994. The project came in 80% over its predicted budget. Since its construction, the tunnel has faced several problems. Fires have disrupted operation of the tunnel. Illegal immigrants and asylum seekers have used the tunnel to enter Britain, causing a minor diplomatic disagreement over the siting of the Sangatte refugee camp, which was eventually closed in 2002


Le tunnel sous la Manche

3. The Big Dig Boston: $14.6 Billions

A route of mega project main highway tunnel through the heart of Boston along the 3.5 miles (5.6 km). Initially, the plan was also to include the relationship between Boston with two major railway.


The Big Dig Boston

2. Three Gorges Dam : $ 26 Billions

Dam of the Yangtze River in the town of Sandouping, which is located in Yiling District Yichang, Hubei province, China. is the world’s largest power plants. Body of the dam was completed in 2006. contains 32 main generators, each with a capacity of 700 MW. Additional six generators at the power plant being installed underground.
the total electricity generating capacity of the dam will eventually reach 22,500 MW. Generate hydroelectric power projects, increasing the capacity of river navigation, and reduce the potential for flooding downstream floods by providing storage space. Until September 2009 the dam has produced 348.4 TWh of electricity.


Three Gorges Dam

1.International Space Center : $157 Billions

International Space Station (ISS) is a research facility developed internationally are currently located in low Earth orbit. On-orbit construction of the station began in 1998 and is scheduled for completion in 2011, with operations continuing until at least until 2015. just like the moon, the station can be seen from Earth with the naked eye, this is the largest man-made orbiting ever in history. ISS serves as a long-term research in the laboratory, and is the site of daily experiments in the fields, including biology, human biology, physics, astronomy and meteorology, conducted in the microgravity environment. The station provides a safe location for testing the efficient, reliable spacecraft systems that will be needed for long-term missions to the Moon and Mars.


International Space Center